SELFISH OLD PEOPLE

Anyone over the age of 32 should read this, as I copied this from a friend…

 

Checking out at the supermarket recently, the young cashier suggested I should bring my own carrier bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.

I apologised and explained, “We didn’t have this green thing back in my earlier days.”

The cashier responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations.”

She was right about one thing — our generation didn’t have the green thing in “Our” day. So what did we have back then…? After some reflection and soul-searching on “Our” day here’s what I remembered we did have….

Back then, we returned milk bottles, fizzy pop bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles repeatedly. So they really were recycled.

But we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

We walked up stairs, because we didn’t have an escalator or lift in every store and office building. We walked to the supermarket and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two minutes up the road.

But she was right. We didn’t have the green thing in our day.

Back then we washed the baby’s nappies because we didn’t have the throwaway kind. We dried clothes on a washing line outside, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 240 volts — wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.

But that young lady is right. We didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Back then we had one TV, or radio, in the house and not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of England. In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used screwed up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn petrol just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

But she’s right. We didn’t have the green thing back then.

We drank from a fountain or tap when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull.

But we didn’t have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the bus, and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their mums and dads into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerised gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 2,000miles out in space in order to find the nearest pizza joint.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the green thing back then?

Please share this on your social networks and blogs in case there are other ‘selfish old people’ who need a lesson in conservation from a smart-arsed, spotty-faced, half-witted teenager passing things across a scanner for a living.

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73 Comments Add yours

  1. I maybe young, but I agree with you wholeheartedly.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Annie B says:

    Reblogged this on Surrendering My Shield and commented:
    This is wonderful. I remember each and every one of these quite well and with great fondness.

    Thing is, should one of these rouge terrorist groups actually manage to go nuclear on our asses and release an EMP – the ‘green’ generation will suddenly experience all these “old folks” ways of living and then some.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Indeed, Annie. Their world, (and sadly ours), would grind to a halt.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Annie B says:

        Absolutely! It makes me sad to think how unprepared people really are if they were to be suddenly thrust into a world without electricity, ATMs, cars, smartphones and fast food.

        I’m so very grateful to have been born in a farming family and was taught to work the soil. To work in the daylight and read by oil lamp at night.

        I am not a lover of TV and totally could survive with my loved ones company and a library of cherished books.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. Yoshiko says:

        I miss the times without smartphones.

        Liked by 3 people

      3. Annie B says:

        Me too! I must confess the internet is something I would miss as it has opened the world to me. But I truly miss the face to face conversations we used to spend hours wrapped up in. The expressions on each other’s faces, the smiles and the deep laughter.

        There’s a lot to be said for the good old ‘pre-wired’ days. At least there is for me.

        Liked by 3 people

      4. Agreed, Annie. I have to say that the inter web has certainly opened up the world for me since I became ill and my world shrank so drastically. I have met so many really great people and would truly miss them and the contact I have with them, (electronic though it is). But life used to be so much easier and more personal. We used to recycle things without even realising we were doing it. It was just so normal for us. Keep Smiling 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Yoshiko says:

        Indeed. Even I miss the face to face conversations.

        Liked by 2 people

      6. It was good to go out for the day and not be contactable. So peaceful.

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Yoshiko says:

        Indeed peaceful

        Liked by 1 person

      8. Me too. Keep Smiling 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      9. Annie B says:

        YEP! Maybe our smiles will erase the hate. I can dream.

        Liked by 1 person

      10. Always dare to dream and never give up hope! 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Brilliant! I remember knocking on doors collecting returnable bottles for pocket money!

    Liked by 4 people

  4. miss agatha armstrong says:

    I still have a telly with the screen the size of a hankie… i am glad I remember those day – I bake by hand and still whisk by hand. But I do confess to loving my blackberry and and the web – I have found so many awesome people and now know I am not alone –

    Liked by 3 people

    1. That sounds like a good balance, Agatha. Keep Smiling 😊

      Like

      1. miss agatha armstrong says:

        Mr Scanlon, thak you for your kind comments. Be well Sir

        Liked by 1 person

      2. My Pleasure, Agatha.😊

        Like

  5. bobbiecoelho says:

    How I remember those days when we thought we could put flowers in soldiers’ guns and stop war and want. We failed utterly – and so will they – unfortunately. The world is not run by idealists but people who think greed is good.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Tragically true, Bobbie.

      Like

  6. Cara says:

    I’m in my late thirties, living in Brooklyn, NY, and NO, we didn’t have this “green” thing when I was younger. But I also remember going to the fruit store or the market with my grandfather when I was a child (so, early 1980s) and he would bring his own cloth satchel to put the groceries in, rather than have to use “those flimsy plastic bags” as he called them. I remember my mother dressing my sister in the dress I outgrew (I think me & both my sisters all three went to preschool in the same plaid dress).

    I was also raised with this radical idea that YOU SHARE WHAT YOU HAVE. Every fall my family would go apple picking upstate, & the Monday after we went, my mother would send me to school (my sisters as well) with big bags of apples for the whole class. Nobody shares any goddamn thing anymore. It’s “my power cord, charge your phone somewhere else” and when did we become so selfish.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. A sad fact of todays society and generations, Cara. Such a sad state of affairs. Things could be so much better for all.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. You’re quite right. My mum has told me many times about how throwaway society has become and I agree with her when she says it’s such a waste. We should go back to reusing and being less wasteful, more mindful of the impact on the environment of our gadgets and actions. My generation, and the one just above me, has a lot to answer for.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. sevoiland says:

    When I was a kid, we were so green that we had a family pledge of sorts. “Use it up, wear it out. Make it do or do without.” OK, I was around 25 when I realized that that was not our family saying – it was from a WWII poster encouraging saving resources for the war effort. My husband and I still practice it, as he is from parents of that era too. As Kermit says, “It isn’t easy being green.” But it sure helps the planet.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hand-me-downs and ‘wearing things out’ was just a way of life back then. So normal and accepted.

      Like

  9. gh0stpupp3t says:

    Hear hear! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Heartafire says:

    So true…of course the advance in technology has been a curse and a blessing. Convenience has become utmost in importance (second to greed). Our situation can’t be blamed on the previous generation but perhaps on the new one?

    Like

    1. Indeed it is. Greed and the ‘need’ for speed and convenience and, lets not forget, the multi-billion dollar companies stoking the fires to keep the money rolling in.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. "A Curious Mind" says:

    So very true,.. .
    From one of those who didn’t have the green thing back then.
    I remember those days well.. .☺

    Like

    1. Oh childhood in the 70’s…

      Liked by 1 person

      1. "A Curious Mind" says:

        and,.. . 60’s☺late♫♪.. .
        I was a young man by the mid 70’s,
        What a time.

        Like

      2. Born ’65 so the 70’s were my playground 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Things were so much better back then. Sometimes it’s kinda scary to think where we’re headed.

    Like

  13. Tessa says:

    Reblogged this on Tessa Can Do IT! and commented:
    This is so true.

    Like

  14. Jay says:

    It’s still possible to reuse and recycle those nasty plastic bags – I use them to line my bathroom and kitchen garbage pails. At my grocery store we get paper bags , which I use for my daily composting. Judgy cashiers had better step off!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You tell em, Jay! 😊

      Like

  15. Love the post, hate the insults.
    Some young people are respectful “spotty faced” teens…that grow up to be respectful “spotty faced” young adults.
    Respect should go both ways no matter what the age.
    Again, great post! Horrible insults.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Also, I would like to add that although I was born long after the 70s, I knew and lived this way of life. We had no money for convenience, but we had wonderful grands who taught us how to work to get these tasks done. ☺

    Liked by 2 people

  17. jenanita01 says:

    Almost everything was better back then…having to work harder for anything made you appreciate them more, I think.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. True, it was more of an achievement.

      Like

  18. jenanita01 says:

    Reblogged this on Anita & Jaye Dawes and commented:
    many a true word…

    Liked by 1 person

  19. This is so true a post. Thanks for sharing 😀

    Liked by 2 people

    1. My pleasure, Irene.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Fibro Chick says:

    Reblogged this on effingfibro and commented:
    Quite so!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. And yet she is still right that we should bring our own bags to the grocery store.

    Like

  22. stevetanham says:

    Reblogged this on stevetanham and commented:
    Sorry, I just had to reblog this . . . and I’m only a bit old!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. henrywest says:

    We also made most of our toys the only electric game I had was Operation. We had to play outside from sun up to sun set. If you didn’t you were put to work. Though now our generation is responsible for making all this electronic stuff. -Which I enjoy. Great post.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. sevoiland says:

    Hi All, Having been born in ’47, I’ve lost the entire thread of this ongoing conversation – that is the disrespectful reference. I’ll go back and find (and fend) it, now that I’m curious. I would not dis the youngsters though. My kids are in their 30s to just 40 … we married at 27, had three within five years to “beat the clock;” and their generation dragged us into the computer filled life. I’m an eager tech learner, but admit I’m not so great at it. I digress. For one however, my kids and their friends have been most respectful to us as well as their parents. Helpful and kind. We are grands now and the little ones follow suit in nature. We are blessed – after a lot of hard work and hope the same for everyone.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I have kids and grandkids and they have all been brought up with respect for others. I don’t have a problem with all todays generation, just arrogant know-alls who have no respect for their elders.

      Keep Smiling 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  25. 1EarthUnited says:

    Great points, can’t argue with experience!

    Liked by 1 person

  26. ladynyo says:

    There is a great divide between them and now. We did collect and return bottles, more of a community effort….and today? these ‘kids’ think they invented the earth movement. “Voluntary Simplicity” was a bible, (by Duane Elgin) back then and I bet 80% of these young’uns haven’t ever heard or read it.

    But! Peace….it needs all of our efforts….

    Lady Nyo (Jane)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Unity is the key…

      Liked by 1 person

  27. "A Curious Mind" says:

    Reblogged this on "A Curious Mind".

    Like

  28. And we didn’t have a cash register to calculate the change, we all had to think for ourselves. Sometimes the cashiers act all put out when we use cash, and heaven help us if we want to modify after they put the amount in the register. But they are so much smarter than us, because they have the green thing. Wait, who came up with the green thing? Teenagers? I doubt it!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We did the green thing before the political correctness brigade gave it that name. To us it was just the sensible thing to do.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, your post is very sensible. We also had repair shops everywhere and called servicemen for appliances. Now everyone just replaces things.

        Liked by 1 person

  29. georgeforfun says:

    Reblogged this on georgeforfun and commented:
    Amen

    Liked by 1 person

  30. alfgarnet says:

    Anything broken, the spotty nosed kids through it away these days without fen trying to mend it and that goes for everything , relationships , respect , and there’s a dam sight less care with in ones community then there ever was in the old days ,,

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So true my friend.

      Like

  31. Lol – nice to put things in perspective 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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